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home : news : putnam   April 29, 2016

9/6/2013 6:07:00 AM
Harvest expected to be bountiful


Keith Boggio pauses next to his combine Thursday while talking about how fall crops are looking. “There’s going to be really good corn, and there’s going to be marginal corn,” he said, noting the extremes in weather the area has had over the past few months. Over all, predictions are that this year will be better than the last.NewsTribune photo/Genna Ord
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Keith Boggio pauses next to his combine Thursday while talking about how fall crops are looking. “There’s going to be really good corn, and there’s going to be marginal corn,” he said, noting the extremes in weather the area has had over the past few months. Over all, predictions are that this year will be better than the last.

NewsTribune photo/Genna Ord



It’s that time of year again. The time of year when grain farmers are chomping at the bit to reap the seeds they sowed the following spring.

Despite the staggered planting dates due to the torrential rains that plagued the area earlier this spring, many farmers are hopeful for a stellar corn crop, however the varied planting dates of the soybeans may lead way to future problems.

Bill Norden, Crop Production Services manager of the Walnut/Manlius branch, explained that because the beans were planted so late with very little late season rains, they have been slower to mature.

“For soybeans there are a few late season diseases showing up but not many to worry about. Another inch of rain would make a huge difference to finish filling the pods out. There’s really nothing for farmers to do bean wise. It’s just a matter of the beans maturing and then harvesting,” Norden said.

The bounteous corn crop is a welcome development for farmers who last year prayed for rain amid a lingering drought.

Jay Marshall, grain merchandiser Northern Partners Cooperative in Mendota, recalled that area farmers hoped for a wet spring to offset the drought and they certainly got their wish — so much so that spring planting was delayed in a deluge that also set off record floods.

“We started out with a wet spring, we turned dry in July and August and we still believe the corn crop is pretty good,” Marshall said. “The bean harvest we’re hoping will be good, but the dryness in August is a question. Beans typically need August rains and we didn’t get any until late August.”

Grain farmer Ted Mochel, of rural Wyanet, is also hoping for some more rain to help with soybean yields, but looks forward to begin harvesting corn in approximately two to three weeks.

“I think the corn will be a little wet coming out of the field, but I think we are going to have a way better crop than last year even as dry as it’s been. Personally, for me, it appears that the ears this year have taken on more growth. I don’t have an opinion on the beans as to where that’s going to end up. The fact that they were planted late with barely no precipitation will be a problem,” Mochel said.

Norden added that corn rootworm pressures may lead to late season standabiltiy problems in corn this year. To avoid a stalk issue problem, he advises farmers to begin harvesting as soon as possible if the stalk begins to fall down.

“We’re looking forward to harvest. It will be a long deal because of the varied planting dates, but it’ll be a good one for sure,” Mochel said.

 Katlyn Rumbold can be reached at (815) 879-5200 or ntprinceton@newstrib.com. The bureau office fax number is (815) 828-0627. Tom Collins can be reached at (815) 220-6930 or courtreporter@newstrib.com.








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Reader Comments

Posted: Saturday, September 7, 2013
Article comment by: MotherEarthSpeaks

In gratitude for all the prayers, meditations, and grounded creations of Mother Nature and her people, this is a miracle made real.
Thank you, all.


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