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Vintage collectibles show attracts decoy, ammo, fishing collectors


NewsTribune photo/Craig Sterrett
Among the hunting and fishing collectibles at a show Sunday in La Salle was a a store display box filled with stick-shaped bobbers that were made in Elmhurst and which were designed to be rigged up and spring-loaded to set the hook automatically. Advertising on the box for the Sure Strike Snap Float included the promise: “Catch the nibblers and bait-stealers.”

Dave and Jeannette Kneebone organized the fifth annual Illinois Valley Hunting and Fishing Collectibles Show, which attracted a great deal of vintage duck decoy and duck and goose call vendors but also vintage ammo collectors and sellers, a Native American goods dealer, fishing lure collector/ dealers, a book seller and a table from the Charles Perdew Museum. At that table, volunteers were distributing information on the Sept. 28 dinner auction, selling new carvings by Charles Moore and selling coffee cups and other items.

“It’s much better this year,” Romeoville decoy and fishing lure seller Rich Ford said. “Dave and Jeannette did a good job getting word out there; there are 20 more vendors than last year.

Ford said his specialty actually is the decoys, but he had a tackle box filled with old fishing plugs and several antique muskellunge lures for sale.

“I know just enough about fishing equipment to get myself into trouble,” he admitted about his buying and selling finesse when it comes to fishing collectibles.

Still, he had some interesting things. For example, he had a store display box filled with stick-shaped bobbers that were made in Elmhurst and which were designed to be rigged up and spring-loaded to set the hook automatically. Advertising on the box for the Sure Strike Snap Float included the promise: “Catch the nibblers and bait-stealers.”

Ford was accompanied at the show by Jeff Rudolph of Highland Park, who had just bought a collection of 180 decoys and was selling some of those, such as a shiny, brown, old mallard hen decoy made by Richard Sheppard of Pekin in the early 20 th century.

Al Bergquist of DeKalb was selling a colorful array of full vintage ammo boxes such as a 1940s box full of ammo for a .38. Other sellers had old caps and out-of-production lures for sell for garage sale prices and also had fishing and hunting items on the same tables for museum-piece prices.





 

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